fantasyeARTh
humans-of-pdx:

"I don’t really like people, but it’s difficult to get comfortable with loneliness. I mean, I’ve tried to have friends, but it never works out. And I’m tired of going out alone. I’m ok staying in at my place. It smells good when I burn incense and I have a lot of records and I can just play video games.” The bus she was waiting for arrived. “Do you need to go?” "It’s ok. Another one will come in ten minutes… But then, you know, sometimes I just want a partner— a relationship. It would be nice to share this part of my life with someone. I’ve been single for years, and you know, there are people I could call if I wanted to. But people always end up saying things that rub me the wrong way, or if I open up to them, suddenly they want me to be their best friend, and I don’t want people to have expectations of me. I don’t want to waste anyone else’s time if I’m not interested in being close to them." Another bus came and went while she told me about the loneliness, wiping tears from her eyes. Then another. “I’m sorry, I’ve talked too long.” "It’s really ok. Sometimes we just need to connect." "Yeah, I forget that sometimes."

humans-of-pdx:

"I don’t really like people, but it’s difficult to get comfortable with loneliness. I mean, I’ve tried to have friends, but it never works out. And I’m tired of going out alone. I’m ok staying in at my place. It smells good when I burn incense and I have a lot of records and I can just play video games.” 

The bus she was waiting for arrived. “Do you need to go?” 

"It’s ok. Another one will come in ten minutes… But then, you know, sometimes I just want a partner— a relationship. It would be nice to share this part of my life with someone. I’ve been single for years, and you know, there are people I could call if I wanted to. But people always end up saying things that rub me the wrong way, or if I open up to them, suddenly they want me to be their best friend, and I don’t want people to have expectations of me. I don’t want to waste anyone else’s time if I’m not interested in being close to them." 

Another bus came and went while she told me about the loneliness, wiping tears from her eyes. Then another. “I’m sorry, I’ve talked too long.” 

"It’s really ok. Sometimes we just need to connect." 

"Yeah, I forget that sometimes."

cockatoo-alice:

zemael:

I don’t really think I’m that good at anatomy (or females) but this is quite a popular request so… I’m making a tutorial, and this is the part to show you what NOT to do with your fellow humans. More coming… eventually.

I suck at breast variations, but I try; see this page for awesome references: x

I wish I could save a whole post. D:

benonceandthefankettes:

Motivational Crutchie~

(I’m sorry this is so long guys omg)

hamburgerprince:

bruh. game over. she’s marrying that guy and having really talented artistic babies.

hamburgerprince:

bruh. game over. she’s marrying that guy and having really talented artistic babies.

eightbreeze:

The Baby Groot School of Dance is open for business! I’ll have this print available at FanExpo
702

eightbreeze:

The Baby Groot School of Dance is open for business! I’ll have this print available at FanExpo

octoswan:

Sailor moon gallery at the NerdMelt
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octoswan:

Sailor moon gallery at the NerdMelt

bluedelliquanti:

faitherinhicks:

scarygoround:

One thing I don’t undertand in comics is characters talking with their mouths closed. You see it all the time in mainstream books. I’m certain there’s a point when I was drawing comics that I flipped from not even thinking about the closed mouth talkers (my early stuff is full of them) to really hating them. It completely punctures the reality of a panel for me if someone’s talking with their mouth closed.

This drives me crazy! A speech bubble floating above a character’s head, and he or she has their mouth shut. Don’t do this! It loses the immediacy of the dialog when the mouth isn’t open.

Like lots of rules in comics, this is a good one to notice and understand why it exists, so that you know when it’s okay to break it. 
Having the character’s mouth open during dialogue helps with the immediacy, as Faith says. You can even draw the mouth in such a way that you can see what word in the bubble they’re emphasizing, and is therefore the most important. See how in David Willis’s fifth panel here, you can tell Jacob’s saying “Sorry?”

But there is value in having a character’s mouth be closed at certain moments in dialogue sequences. If you see a closed mouth after a word balloon, your brain adds a “beat” for finality. It can add time and alter the rhythm of a conversation. It can also clarify the mood of a character or scene.
I reread the archives of Templar, Arizona recently, and there’s a character, Reagan, who dominates nearly every scene she’s in. She’s physically expressive and has a distinct speaking style. He mouth rarely closes. When it does, it’s during a very serious conversation. She’s dialing down her bombastic personality so other people will pay attention to her, because something is wrong.

When I designed my comic’s leads, I wanted to physically distinguish them in as many ways as I could. In Al’s default state, his mouth is usually closed. Al evolved into a character who does better with silence, because his mustache is a great tool for being expressive without any dialogue. Chuck Jones taught me that.

Brendan’s default, on the other hand, is having his mouth open most of the time. It helps show how he dominates the dialogue and the chemistry between him and Al. When his mouth is shown closed during a dialogue scene, it’s very deliberate. When you notice artists following these helpful rules, understand when it might be more effective to break them.

bluedelliquanti:

faitherinhicks:

scarygoround:

One thing I don’t undertand in comics is characters talking with their mouths closed. You see it all the time in mainstream books. I’m certain there’s a point when I was drawing comics that I flipped from not even thinking about the closed mouth talkers (my early stuff is full of them) to really hating them. It completely punctures the reality of a panel for me if someone’s talking with their mouth closed.

This drives me crazy! A speech bubble floating above a character’s head, and he or she has their mouth shut. Don’t do this! It loses the immediacy of the dialog when the mouth isn’t open.

Like lots of rules in comics, this is a good one to notice and understand why it exists, so that you know when it’s okay to break it. 

Having the character’s mouth open during dialogue helps with the immediacy, as Faith says. You can even draw the mouth in such a way that you can see what word in the bubble they’re emphasizing, and is therefore the most important. See how in David Willis’s fifth panel here, you can tell Jacob’s saying “Sorry?”

amazi-girl's boots should be uggs

But there is value in having a character’s mouth be closed at certain moments in dialogue sequences. If you see a closed mouth after a word balloon, your brain adds a “beat” for finality. It can add time and alter the rhythm of a conversation. It can also clarify the mood of a character or scene.

I reread the archives of Templar, Arizona recently, and there’s a character, Reagan, who dominates nearly every scene she’s in. She’s physically expressive and has a distinct speaking style. He mouth rarely closes. When it does, it’s during a very serious conversation. She’s dialing down her bombastic personality so other people will pay attention to her, because something is wrong.

image

When I designed my comic’s leads, I wanted to physically distinguish them in as many ways as I could. In Al’s default state, his mouth is usually closed. Al evolved into a character who does better with silence, because his mustache is a great tool for being expressive without any dialogue. Chuck Jones taught me that.

image

Brendan’s default, on the other hand, is having his mouth open most of the time. It helps show how he dominates the dialogue and the chemistry between him and Al. When his mouth is shown closed during a dialogue scene, it’s very deliberate. When you notice artists following these helpful rules, understand when it might be more effective to break them.

image